IMMIGRATION SERVICES FOR
FAMILIES AND INDIVIDUALS

We are here to help you.

Immigration law is complicated. If you want to know how, or if, you can bring your fiancé(e)  or spouse, parent or sibling to the United States, or file paperwork for a family member who is already in the country, or submit a form for DACA or TPS or other immigration benefits, Armstrong Law Offices PLLC can help. During an initial online consultation, you will speak with attorney Carol Armstrong. She will evaluate your unique family situation and advise whether you are eligible, and if so, how the process works and the best estimate of a timeline. If you engage Armstrong Law Offices PLLC to handle your immigration case, you will receive a credit for your consultation fee.

MARRIAGE (SPOUSAL) VISAS

In order to bring your spouse (husband or wife) to live in the United States as a Green Card holder (permanent resident), you must be either a U.S. citizen or Green Card holder.

FIANCÉ(E) VISAS

If you are a U.S. citizen who wants to bring your foreign fiancé(e) to the United States in order to get married, you will need to file a Form 129F, Petition for Alien Fiancé(e). This is the first step to obtaining a K-1 nonimmigrant visa for your fiancé(e). The K-1 nonimmigrant visa is also known as a fiancé(e) visa.

DACA (DEFERRED ACTION
FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS)

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal. They are also eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a use of prosecutorial discretion to defer removal action against an individual for a certain period of time. Deferred action does not provide lawful status.

TPS (TEMPORARY PROTECTED STATUS)

he Secretary of Homeland Security may designate a foreign country for TPS due to conditions in the country that temporarily prevent the country's nationals from returning safely, or in certain circumstances, where the country is unable to handle the return of its nationals adequately.  USCIS may grant TPS to eligible nationals of certain countries (or parts of countries), who are already in the United States.  Eligible individuals without nationality who last resided in the designated country may also be granted TPS.

HARDSHIP AND PROVISIONAL WAIVERS
PERMISSION TO APPLY FOR READMISSION
(FORM I-601; FORM I-212)

Since March 4, 2013, certain immigrant visa applicants who are immediate relatives (spouses, children and parents) of U.S. citizens can apply for provisional unlawful presence waivers  before they leave the United States for their consular interview.  On August 29, 2016, the provisional unlawful presence waiver process was expanded to all individuals statutorily eligible for an immigrant visa and a waiver of inadmissibility for unlawful presence in the U.S

VAWA, T AND U VISAS

As a battered spouse, child, or parent, you may file an immigrant visa petition under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), as amended by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).


The U nonimmigrant status (U visa) is set aside for victims of certain crimes who have suffered mental or physical abuse and are helpful to law enforcement or government officials in the investigation or prosecution of criminal activity. 

T nonimmigrant status is a temporary immigration benefit that enables certain victims of a severe form of human trafficking to remain in the United States for up to 4 years if they have assisted law enforcement in an investigation or prosecution of human trafficking

CITIZENSHIP AND NATURALIZATION

The decision to apply for U.S. citizenship is an important step for many immigrants. Citizenship offers many benefits and carries important responsibilities. Citizenship can be acquired at or after birth, but before age 18, through parents who are U.S. citizens. Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a lawful permanent resident (green card holder) who meets the legal requirements.